You may be eligible for the Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program.

Gazyva® (dornase alfa) Co-pay card

With the Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program, eligible patients with commercial insurance could pay as little as $5 per treatment for GAZYVA. Co-pay assistance of up to $25,000 is provided for each 12-month eligibility period.

  • This program can assist with the cost of your Genentech Oncology product only. It cannot assist with the cost of other medicines you may take in addition to your Genentech Oncology product or nor can the program assist with facility fees.
  • A single $5 copay applies for patients who are on an FDA-approved combination of two or more Genentech medications. 

You may be eligible if you:

  • Have a valid prescription for GAZYVA for an FDA-approved use
  • Reside in the United States or U.S. Territories
  • Are over the age of 18, or have a Legally Authorized Person over the age of 18 to manage the program
  • Have commercial (private or non-governmental) insurance. This includes plans available through state and federal health insurance exchanges
  • Are not currently receiving GAZYVA from the Genentech Patient Foundation
  • Are not currently receiving assistance from any other charitable organization for any of your out-of-pocket costs that are covered by the Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program
  • Are not using a state or federal healthcare plan to pay for their medication. This includes, but is not limited to, Medicare, Medicaid and TRICARE
Under the program, the patient will pay a co-pay. After reaching the maximum program benefit, the patient will be responsible for all out-of-pocket expenses. All participants are responsible for reporting the receipt of all program benefits as required by any insurer or by law. No party may seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received through this Program. The program is only valid in the United States and U.S. Territories. This program is void where prohibited by law and shall follow state restrictions in relation to AB-rated generic equivalents (e.g., MA, CA) where applicable. The patient, guardian, prescriber, hospital and any other person using the program agree not to seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received by the patient through the offer of this program. Genentech reserves the right to rescind, revoke or amend the program without notice at any time. Additional terms and conditions apply.
 

View full TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Contact Us

Questions? Contact a Genentech Oncology Co-pay Specialist

Call 855-692-6729 (Mon.–Fri., 6AM–5PM PST, except major holidays)

  • We are open from 6AM-5PM PST, Mon. through Fri., except for the following holidays:

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    • Memorial Day
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Indication

GAZYVA® (obinutuzumab) is a prescription medicine used with the chemotherapy drug, bendamustine, followed by GAZYVA alone for follicular lymphoma (FL) in adults who did not respond to a rituximab-containing regimen, or whose FL returned after such treatment.
 

What is the most important safety information I should know about GAZYVA?

Tell your doctor right away about any side effect you experience. GAZYVA can cause side effects that can become serious or life-threatening, including:

  • Hepatitis B Virus (HBV): Hepatitis B can cause liver failure and death. If you have a history of hepatitis B infection, GAZYVA could cause it to return. You should not receive GAZYVA if you have active hepatitis B liver disease. Your doctor or healthcare team will need to screen you for hepatitis B before, and monitor you during and after, your treatment with GAZYVA. Sometimes this will require treatment for hepatitis B. Symptoms of hepatitis include: worsening of fatigue and yellow discoloration of skin or eyes

  • Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML): PML is a rare and serious brain infection caused by a virus. PML can be fatal. Your weakened immune system could put you at risk. Your doctor will watch for symptoms. Symptoms of PML include: confusion, difficulty talking or walking, dizziness or loss of balance, and vision problems

Who should not receive GAZYVA?

  • Do NOT receive GAZYVA if you have had an allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis or serum sickness) to GAZYVA. Tell your healthcare provider if you have had an allergic reaction to obinutuzumab or any other ingredients in GAZYVA in the past

What are the additional possible serious side effects of GAZYVA?

Tell your doctor right away about any side effect you experience. GAZYVA can cause side effects that may become severe or life-threatening, including:

  • Infusion-Related Reactions (IRRs): These side effects may occur during or within 24 hours of any GAZYVA infusion. Some IRRs can be serious, including, but not limited to, severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis), acute life-threatening breathing problems, or other life-threatening IRRs. If you have a reaction, the infusion is either slowed or stopped until your symptoms are resolved. Most patients are able to complete infusions and receive medication again. However, if the IRR is life-threatening, the infusion of GAZYVA will be permanently stopped. Your healthcare team will take steps to help lessen any side effects you may have to the infusion process. You may be given medicines to take before each GAZYVA treatment. Symptoms of IRRs may include: fast heartbeat, tiredness, dizziness, headache, redness of the face, nausea, chills, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, difficulty breathing, and chest discomfort

  • Hypersensitivity Reactions Including Serum Sickness: Some people receiving GAZYVA may have severe or life-threatening allergic reactions. This reaction may be severe, may happen during or after an infusion, and may affect many areas of the body. If an allergic reaction occurs, your doctor will stop the infusion and permanently discontinue GAZYVA

  • Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS): Tumor lysis syndrome, including fatal cases, has been reported in patients receiving GAZYVA. GAZYVA works to break down cancer cells quickly. As cancer cells break apart, their contents are released into the blood. These contents may cause damage to organs and the heart and may lead to kidney failure requiring the need for dialysis treatment. Your doctor may prescribe medication to help prevent TLS. Your doctor will also conduct regular blood tests to check for TLS. Symptoms of TLS may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and tiredness

  • Infections: While you’re taking GAZYVA, you may develop infections. Some of these infections may be fatal and severe, so be sure to talk to your doctor if you think you have an infection. Patients administered GAZYVA in combination with chemotherapy, followed by GAZYVA alone are at a high risk of infections during and after treatment. Patients with a history of recurring or chronic infections may be at an increased risk of infection. Patients with an active infection should not be treated with GAZYVA. Patients taking GAZYVA plus bendamustine may be at higher risk for fatal or severe infections compared to patients taking GAZYVA plus CHOP or CVP

  • Low White Blood Cell Count: When you have an abnormally low count of infection-fighting white blood cells, it is called neutropenia. While you are taking GAZYVA, your doctor will do blood work to check your white blood cell count. Severe and life-threatening neutropenia can develop during or after treatment with GAZYVA. Some cases of neutropenia can last for more than one month. If your white blood cell count is low, your doctor may prescribe medication to help prevent infections

  • Low Platelet Count: Platelets help stop bleeding or blood loss. GAZYVA may reduce the number of platelets you have in your blood; having low platelet count is called thrombocytopenia. This may affect the clotting process. While you are taking GAZYVA, your doctor will do blood work to check your platelet count. Severe and life-threatening thrombocytopenia can develop during treatment with GAZYVA. Fatal bleeding events have occurred in patients treated with GAZYVA. If your platelet count gets too low, your treatment may be delayed or reduced

The most common side effects seen with GAZYVA in a study that included relapsed or refractory FL patients were infusion-related reactions, fatigue, low white blood cell counts, cough, upper respiratory tract infection, and joint or muscle pain.

What other information should I tell my doctor before receiving GAZYVA?

You should talk to your doctor about:

  • Immunizations: Before receiving GAZYVA therapy, tell your healthcare provider if you have recently received or are scheduled to receive a vaccine. People who are treated with GAZYVA should not receive live vaccines

  • Pregnancy: Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, think that you might be pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. GAZYVA may harm your unborn baby. Speak to your doctor about using GAZYVA while you are pregnant. Talk to your doctor or your child’s doctor about the safety and timing of live virus vaccinations to your infant if you received GAZYVA during pregnancy. Women of childbearing potential should use effective contraception while taking GAZYVA and for 6 months after your GAZYVA treatment

  • Breastfeeding: Because of the potential risk of serious side reactions in breastfed children, women should not breastfeed while taking GAZYVA and for 6 months after your last dose

Tell your doctor about any side effects.

These are not all of the possible side effects of GAZYVA. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

GAZYVA is available by prescription only.

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088, or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see the accompanying full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNINGS, for additional Important Safety Information.